Kooksta.com
 
 

Registered Nurse RN-BSN

Acute kidney injury (also called acute renal failure) nursing NCLEX review lecture on the nursing management, stages, pathophysiology, and causes (prerenal, intrarenal, postrenal).

DUTIES

Registered nurses (RN) provide and coordinate patient care, educate patients and the public about various health conditions, and provide advice and emotional support to patients and their family members. Registered nurses' job duties often depend on where they work and the kind of patients they assist. For example, an oncology nurse may work with cancer patients or a geriatric nurse may work with elderly patients. Some registered nurses combine one or more areas of practice. For example, a pediatric oncology nurse works with children and teens who have cancer.

Because patients in hospitals and nursing care facilities need round-the-clock care, nurses in these settings usually work in shifts, covering all 24 hours. They may work nights, weekends, and holidays. They may be on call, which means that they are on duty and must be available to work on short notice. Nurses who work in offices, schools, and other places that do not provide 24-hour care are more likely to work regular business. Employers may prefer candidates who have some related work experience or certification in a specialty area, such as gerontology.

Registered nurses may spend a lot of time walking, bending, stretching, and standing. They are vulnerable to back injuries because they often must lift and move patients. The work of registered nurses may put them in close contact with people who have infectious diseases, and they frequently come in contact with potentially harmful and hazardous drugs and other substances. Therefore, registered nurses must follow strict, standardized guidelines to guard against diseases and other dangers, such as radiation, accidental needle sticks, or the chemicals used to create a sterile and clean environment.

  • Assess conditions of the intake patient.
  • Record the medical histories and symptoms of patients.
  • Observe patients and record the observations.
  • Administer patients' medicines and treatments.
  • Set up plans for patients' care or contribute information to existing plans.
  • Consult and collaborate with doctors and other healthcare professionals.
  • Operate and monitor medical equipment.
  • Help perform diagnostic tests and analyze the results.
  • Teach patients and their families how to manage illnesses or injuries.
  • Explain what to do at home after treatment.

Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) are a type of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN). They provide direct patient care in one of many nursing specialties, such as psychiatric-mental health or pediatrics. CNSs also provide indirect care, by working with other nurses and various other staff to improve the quality of care that patients receive. They often serve in leadership roles and may educate and advise other nursing staff. CNSs also may conduct research and may advocate for certain policies.

EDUCATION

To become a Registered Nurse(RN), you will be required to take courses in medical terminology, patient care and life sciences. Although associate degree programs provide students with adequate nursing training, a bachelor's degree provides greater clinical exposure and a stronger general education. A 4-year BSN program allows students to study specialized areas of nursing, including pediatrics, geriatrics and mental health nursing. An RN has to cope with more responsibility, and must oversee the work of LPNs and CNAs under their supervision. If you wish to continue advancement, a masters degree and several years of experience as a nurse, may qualify you for the Nurse Practitioner (NP) credential.

In all nursing education programs, students take courses in anatomy, physiology, microbiology, chemistry, nutrition, and psychology. Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs typically take 4 years to complete, while an Associates Degree in Nursing (ADN) and diploma programs usually take 2 to 3 years to complete. Diploma programs are typically offered by hospitals or medical centers, and there are far fewer diploma programs than there are BSN and ADN programs. All programs will include supervised clinical rotations.

Registered nurses with an ADN or diploma may go back to school to earn a bachelor's degree through an accredited RN-to-BSN program. There are also master's degree programs in nursing, and accelerated programs for those who wish to enter the nursing profession and already hold a bachelor's degree in another field. Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) must earn a master's degree in nursing and typically already have 1 or more years of work experience as an RN or in a related field. CNSs who conduct research typically need a doctoral degree.

CERTIFICATION

In all states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories, registered nurses must have a nursing license. To become licensed, nurses must graduate from an approved nursing program and pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN). Other requirements for licensing, such as passing a criminal background check, vary by state. Each state's board of nursing provides specific requirements. For more information on the NCLEX-RN and a list of state boards of nursing, visit the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.

Nurses may become certified through professional associations in specific areas, such as ambulatory care, gerontology, and pediatrics, among others. Although certification is usually voluntary, it demonstrates adherence to a higher standard, and some employers require it. In addition, registered nursing positions may require certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), basic life support (BLS) certification, and/or advanced cardiac life support (ACLS).

Certification requirements include board certification by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP). The license period varies by individual state, but is usually valid for either two or three years, at which time you'll need to renew. Registered nurses (RNs) are not required to be certified in a particular specialty by state law. For example, it isn't necessary to be a Certified Medical-Surgical Registered Nurse (CMSRN) to work on a hospital Medical-Surgical (MedSurg) floor, and most MedSurg nurses are not CMSRNs. To keep your license current, you must take continuing education courses, and renew your license every few years. There are a fixed number of credits that each state requires, and if you work in a hospital facility, these courses may be offered on-site.

QUALITIES FOR SUCCESS

Ask yourself if you can see yourself being a nurse, having daily contact with patients who may be elderly, ill, or recovering from surgery. Other patients may have physical or emotional disabilities, which can be challenging. While nursing classes and internships will prepare you well, certain innate qualities that you bring to bear will help you succeed as a nurse.

Nurses must relate well with other people, and the personal touches that a nurse adds to overall medial care can give one-on-one attention that patients remember the most.


Qualities of a Successful Nurse
Nurses should be comfortable performing physical tasks, such as moving patients. They may be on their feet for most of their shift.
Registered nurses need emotional resilience and the ability to manage their emotions to cope with human suffering, emergencies, and other stresses.
Registered nurses must be responsible and detail oriented because they must make sure that patients get the correct treatments and medicines at the right time.
Registered nurses must be able to communicate effectively with patients in order to understand their concerns and assess their health conditions.
Nurses need to clearly explain instructions, such as how to take medication. They must work in teams with other health professionals and communicate the patients' needs.
Registered nurses must assess changes in the health status of patients, such as determining when to take corrective action and when to make referrals.

Hepatitis


-Hepatitis A: transmitted fecal-oral in contaminated food or water, vaccine is available, anti-HAV IgM or IgG to diagnose, post-exposure: immune globulin (2 weeks after exposure), acute only
-Hepatitis B: transmitted via blood and body fluids...most commonly sexual intercourse and IV drug use, HBsAg (infectious) and anti-HAV (immune), vaccine available, acute and chronic
-Hepatitis C: transmitted via blood and body fluids...most commonly IV drug use, NO vaccine available, acute and chronic

Blood Flow in the Heart


When learning the blood flow of the heart, it helps to divide it up into two sections: The left side and the right side. There are six structures on each of these sides that are used during blood circulation. The left side receives blood that left the lungs. The right side sends blood right to the lungs. In addition, the tricuspid is on the right side, and the bicuspid is on the left side.

Care Plan Tutorial


This nursing care plan tutorial has a free sample care plan resource that you can use to help develop your care plans for nursing school. Nursing care plans are often a big part of nursing school, and nurses do use care plans on the job.

Pharmacology


Pharmacology study tips for nursing students and medical students: This video discusses how to study for pharmacology in nursing school and gives study strategy tips and tricks on how to pass pharmacology.

JOB OUTLOOK

Employment of registered nurses is projected to grow 15% over the coming 10 years, much faster than the average for all health-related occupations. Demand for healthcare services will increase because of the aging population. Nurses also will be needed to educate and care for patients with various chronic conditions, such as arthritis, dementia, diabetes, and obesity.

The financial pressure on hospitals to discharge patients as soon as possible may result in more people being admitted to long-term care facilities and outpatient care centers. Job growth is expected in facilities that provide long-term rehabilitation for stroke and head injury patients, and in facilities that treat people with Alzheimer's disease. In addition, because many older people prefer to be treated at home or in residential care facilities, registered nurses will be in demand in those settings.

Growth is also expected to be faster than average in outpatient care centers, where patients do not stay overnight, such as those which provide same-day chemotherapy, rehabilitation, and surgery. In addition, an increased number of procedures, as well as more sophisticated procedures previously done only in hospitals, are being performed in ambulatory care settings and physicians' offices.

ADVANCEMENT

Most registered nurses begin as staff nurses in hospitals or community health settings. With experience, good performance, and continuous education, they can move to other settings or be promoted to positions with more responsibility. In management, nurses can advance to become a clinical nurse manager, charge nurse, or head nurse. Some nurses move into the business side of healthcare. Their nursing expertise and experience on a healthcare team equip them to manage ambulatory, acute, or chronic-care businesses. Employers may desire registered nurses for jobs in health planning and development, policy development, and quality assurance.

Some RNs may become nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, or nurse practitioners, which are types of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). APRN positions require a master's degree at a minimum. APRNs may provide primary and specialty care, and in many states they may prescribe medications.

        Kooksta.com
Degree Programs
Popular Majors
    Test Prep     Privacy Policy     Terms of Use     About     Contact

This website is not affiliated with any educational organization, and all trademarks are the exclusive property of the respective owners. Kooksta.com is the work of a group of students in Bangkok, and all copyrighted works on this website are offered for educational purposes only, governed by the four-factor rule, section 107 of the US Copyright Act, 1976.